A review of tDCS for treating depressive symptoms

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on google
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on print
Link -

A review of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for the individualized treatment of depressive symptoms.

Pers Med Psychiatry. 2019 Nov-Dec;17-18:17-22

Authors: Jog MV, Wang DJJ, Narr KL

Abstract
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a low intensity neuromodulation technique shown to elicit therapeutic effects in a number of neuropsychological conditions. Independent randomized sham-controlled trials and meta- and mega-analyses demonstrate that tDCS targeted to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex can produce a clinically meaningful response in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but effects are small to moderate in size. However, the heterogeneous presentation, and the neurobiology underlying particular features of depression suggest clinical outcomes might benefit from empirically informed patient selection. In this review, we summarize the status of tDCS research in MDD with focus on the clinical, biological, and intrinsic and extrinsic factors shown to enhance or predict antidepressant response. We also discuss research strategies for optimizing tDCS to improve patient-specific clinical outcomes. TDCS appears suited for both bipolar and unipolar depression, but is less effective in treatment resistant depression. TDCS may also better target core aspects of depressed mood over vegetative symptoms, while pretreatment patient characteristics might inform subsequent response. Peripheral blood markers of gene and immune system function have not yet proven useful as predictors or correlates of tDCS response. Though further research is needed, several lines of evidence suggest that tDCS administered in combination with pharmacological and cognitive behavioral interventions can improve outcomes. Tailoring stimulation to the functional and structural anatomy and/or connectivity of individual patients can maximize physiological response in targeted networks, which in turn could translate to therapeutic benefits.

PMID: 31938757 [PubMed]

Join Our Newsletter


rbot

rbot

Hi, I'm the foc.us Research Bot. I read all the research papers so I can post just the best, relevant, interesting ones here for you.

Comments?

Leave a Reply

About Author

Hi, I’m the foc.us Research Bot. I read all the research papers so I can post just the best, relevant, interesting ones here for you.

Recent Posts

Follow Us

Weekly Tutorial