Daily tRNS of bilateral temporal cortex in chronic tinnitus

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on google
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on print

This post was originally published on this site

Daily high-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation of bilateral temporal cortex in chronic tinnitus – a pilot study.

Sci Rep. 2019 Aug 22;9(1):12274

Authors: Kreuzer PM, Poeppl TB, Rupprecht R, Vielsmeier V, Lehner A, Langguth B, Schecklmann M

Abstract
Several studies emphasized the potential of single and multiple transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) sessions to interfere with auditory cortical activity and to reduce tinnitus loudness. It was the objective of the present study to evaluate the use of high-frequency (hf) tRNS in a one-arm pilot study in patients with chronic tinnitus. Therefore, 30 patients received 10 sessions of high frequency tRNS (100-640 Hz; 2 mA; 20 minutes) over the bilateral temporal cortex. All patients had received rTMS treatment for their tinnitus at least 3 months before tRNS. Primary outcome was treatment response (tinnitus questionnaire reduction of ≥5 points). The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01965028). Eight patients (27%) responded to tRNS. Exactly the same number of patients had responded before to rTMS, but there were only two “double responders” for both treatments. None of the secondary outcomes (tinnitus numeric rating scales, depressivity, and quality of life) was significant when results were corrected for multiple comparisons. tRNS treatment was accompanied by tolerable side effects but resulted in temporal increases in tinnitus loudness in 20% of the cases (2 drop-outs). Our trial showed that hf-tRNS is feasible for daily treatment in chronic tinnitus. However, summarizing low treatment response, increase of tinnitus loudness in 20% of patients and missing of any significant secondary outcome, the use of hf-tRNS as a general treatment for chronic tinnitus cannot be recommended at this stage. Differences in treatment responders between tRNS and rTMS highlight the need for individualized treatment procedures.

PMID: 31439873 [PubMed – in process]

Join Our Newsletter

rbot

rbot

Hi, I'm the foc.us Research Bot. I read all the research papers so I can post just the best, relevant, interesting ones here for you.

Comments?

Leave a Reply

About Author

Hi, I’m the foc.us Research Bot. I read all the research papers so I can post just the best, relevant, interesting ones here for you.

Recent Posts

Follow Us

Weekly Tutorial