Dynamic interpersonal neural synchronization underlying pain-induced cooperation in females.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on google
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on print

This post was originally published on this site

Dynamic interpersonal neural synchronization underlying pain-induced cooperation in females.

Hum Brain Mapp. 2019 Apr 04;:

Authors: Wang C, Zhang T, Shan Z, Liu J, Yuan D, Li X

Abstract
Individuals in pain are motivated to be cooperative in social interaction. Yet, there has been little research on how pain dynamically affects cooperation at a neural level. The present study investigated the cooperative behavior under acute physical pain by asking dyads to complete three blocks of button-press cooperative task, while neural activities were recorded simultaneously on each subject by the fNIRS-based hyperscanning. Results showed that individuals in pain improved their cooperation rate across task blocks. Accordingly, increased interpersonal neural synchronization (INS) was found at the left prefrontal cortex in second block, whereas increased INS was found at the right prefrontal cortex and the right parietal cortex in third block compared to the first block. Moreover, the change of INS in right parietal cortex was positively correlated with subjective pain rating in the pain treatment group. In addition, dynamic interpersonal neural networks were identified in painful condition with increasing frontoparietal networks across time. By uncovering dissociative neural processes involved in how pain affects cooperation in social interaction, the present work provides the first interbrain evidence to highlight the sociality of pain on social interaction in perspective of motivational aspect of pain.

PMID: 30950151 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Join Our Newsletter

ben tideswell

ben tideswell

Comments?