Executive Function Performance in Young Adults When Cycling at an Active Workstation: An fNIRS Study.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on google
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on print

This post was originally published on this site

Executive Function Performance in Young Adults When Cycling at an Active Workstation: An fNIRS Study.

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Mar 28;16(7):

Authors: Huang T, Gu Q, Deng Z, Tsai C, Xue Y, Zhang J, Zou L, Chen Z, Wang K

Abstract
BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the effects of self-paced cycling at an active workstation on executive functions and cortical activity.
METHODS: In a crossover study design, 37 young adults (45.9% females) were randomly assigned to the following two task conditions: (1) performing cognitive tests during sitting, (2) performing cognitive tests while cycling at an active workstation. Executive functions were assessed by the Stroop color and word test and the task-switching paradigm. Cortical activity was monitored using a multi-channel functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) system.
RESULTS: The behavioral results showed that there were no significant differences on the Stroop interference effects (P = 0.66) between the sitting and the cycling conditions. In all probability, no differences on the global switch costs (P = 0.90) and local switch costs (P = 0.67) were observed between the sitting and the cycling conditions. For the fNIRS results, the oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) in response to the Stroop interference in channels 5, 10, and 12 were decreased during the cycling condition (all Ps < 0.05, FDR-corrected). Conversely, the oxy-Hb associated with the global switch costs in channels 3, 29, and 31 were increased during the cycling condition (all Ps < 0.05, FDR-corrected).
CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicated that behavioral performances on executive functions were not affected by cycling at an active workstation, while cognitive resources were reallocated during cycling at an active workstation.

PMID: 30925783 [PubMed – in process]

Join Our Newsletter

ben tideswell

ben tideswell

Comments?